May 26 — Last Model T Rolls Off the Assembly Line (1927)

It is the machine that changed the world.  It started mass manufacturing.  It created a huge middle class.  It gave good jobs to unskilled workers, and they created labor unions.  It put average Americans on wheels.  It was the Tin Lizzie.  And after two decades of production, the last Model T—the 15th million one—rolled off […]

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April 29 — Dancing with Nature’s Stars

In 1982, the International Theatre Institute, working through UNESCO, created International Dance Day, occurring on April 29 each year.  The date recognizes the birthday of Jean-Georges Noverre, the originator of modern ballet, who lived from 1727-1810.             In support of each year’s recognition, a prominent representative of dance pens a message regarding the universality and […]

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April 28 — Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Announced (1986)

It took two days before the government of the Soviet Union admitted that something had happened to their nuclear power facilities at Chernobyl.  They might never have admitted anything, if Scandinavian scientists hadn’t begun to detect increased levels of radiation in the air on Monday morning, April 28, 1986.             What the Soviet Union had […]

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April 27 — Soil Conservation Service Created (1935)

Normally I would title an entry like this one with the current name of the agency or park under discussion.  But today I’ve used the original name—Soil Conservation Service—because it represents more directly the nature of the agency.  Today, the agency is called the Natural Resources Conservation Service, a nice name but much more ambiguous […]

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April 25 — Theodore Roosevelt National Park Established (1947)

When Teddy Roosevelt, 26th President of the United States, died on January 6, 1919, it wasn’t long before conservationists began advocating for a park in his name.  Roosevelt was, after all, our “conservation president,” a leader who established 150 national forests, 51 federal bird reserves, 4 national game preserves, 5 national parks and 18 national […]

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April 23 — World Book Day

Normally, this calendar notes the birth dates of important conservationists and environmentalists.  But today is noted because it was the date when three famous authors died—William Shakespeare, Miquel de Cervantes, and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega.  Not only did they die on the same date, April 23, but they all died on the very same […]

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April 8 — A Tribute to the Endangered Species Act

I’ve searched the internet from stem to stern, consulted all my reference sources—and I can find nothing of calendar-worthy significance that has occurred on April 8.  I can’t even find anything remotely amusing that I can try to connect to conservation.  But in looking just a little farther, I found something perhaps minor, but also […]

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April 2 — Maria Sibylla Merian, German Entomologist, Born (1647)

For much of history, insects were considered “beasts of the devil” and therefore were not studied.  This began to change in the 1600s, when a few conscientious observers of nature decided to turn their attention to insects.  One of the first—and foremost—was a German woman, Maria Sibylla Merian.             Merian was born on April 2, […]

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April 1 — Wangari Maathai, Kenyan Conservationist, Born (1940)

Wangari Maathai accomplished much in her life.  Most would list her selection as the Nobel Peace Prize laureate as her greatest accomplishment.  But I think what earned her the prize is much more notable:  Wangari Maathai planted 50 million trees!             Wangari Muta was born on April 1, 1940, in a small rural village in […]

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