November 8 — World Town Planning Day

The natural habitat for the human species has become the city.  Therefore, to make a sustainable world, we need to make sustainable cities.  World Town Planning Day, also known as World Urbanism Day, is celebrated on November 8 to highlight just this need. World Town Planning Day was the idea of urban planner Carlos Maria […]

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November 7 — Costa Rica Constitution Enacted (1949)

The codification of a nation’s constitution may seem like an odd entry for a conservation calendar, but Costa Rica made an enormous sustainability decision with one simple eight-word statement—Article 12:  “The Army as a permanent institution is proscribed.”  Instead of funding an army, Costa Rica chose to fund peace and prosperity, creating an educated, healthy […]

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November 5 — Ethelwynn Trewavas Born (1900)

Ethelwynn Trewavas, one of the world’s foremost fish taxonomists of the 20th Century, was born on November 5, 1900 (died 1994).  Among her research projects that studied fish from around the world, Trewavas is most remembered for her work on the fishes of Lake Malawi, Africa. Trewavas was born in Penzance, Cornwall, England, where her […]

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November 4 — UNESCO Created (1946)

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) came into force on November 4, 1946.  The international treaty creating the group had been signed earlier, but it became operational with ratification by 20 countries.  It is noteworthy in conservation for its protection of World Heritage Sites. Near the end of World War 2, European […]

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November 2 — National Bison Day

The American bison became our “national mammal” when President Obama signed the National Bison Legacy Act into law in 2016.  The designation is appropriate, recognizing the parallel paths followed by this magnificent animal and the American approach to conservation. The first Saturday in November has been recognized as National Bison Day since 2013.  I’ve listed […]

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November 1 — Ansel Adams Shoots “Moonrise” (1941)

The most famous landscape photograph in history, taken by the greatest landscape photographer in history, was shot in the early evening of November 1, 1941.  Both the photograph and the effort to date its creation are remarkable stories. The life of Ansel Adams is chronicled on his birthday, February 20, but this day is special […]

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October 31 — Lincoln Highway Dedicated (1913)

Most historians consider the completion of the transcontinental railroad in 1869 to be the end of the frontier era in America.  The country had become tied together coast-to-coast, with citizens able to travel in relative ease and safety across the nation in a short time.  A similar event—the dedication of the Lincoln Highway—occurred on October […]

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