November 4 — UNESCO Created (1946)

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) came into force on November 4, 1946.  The international treaty creating the group had been signed earlier, but it became operational with ratification by 20 countries.  It is noteworthy in conservation for its protection of World Heritage Sites. Near the end of World War 2, European […]

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November 2 — National Bison Day

The American bison became our “national mammal” when President Obama signed the National Bison Legacy Act into law in 2016.  The designation is appropriate, recognizing the parallel paths followed by this magnificent animal and the American approach to conservation. The first Saturday in November has been recognized as National Bison Day since 2013.  I’ve listed […]

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November 1 — Ansel Adams Shoots “Moonrise” (1941)

The most famous landscape photograph in history, taken by the greatest landscape photographer in history, was shot in the early evening of November 1, 1941.  Both the photograph and the effort to date its creation are remarkable stories. The life of Ansel Adams is chronicled on his birthday, February 20, but this day is special […]

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October 31 — Lincoln Highway Dedicated (1913)

Most historians consider the completion of the transcontinental railroad in 1869 to be the end of the frontier era in America.  The country had become tied together coast-to-coast, with citizens able to travel in relative ease and safety across the nation in a short time.  A similar event—the dedication of the Lincoln Highway—occurred on October […]

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October 26 — Erie Canal Opens (1825)

I’ve got an old mule and her name is Sal Fifteen years on the Erie Canal She’s a good old worker and a good old pal Fifteen years on the Erie Canal We’ve hauled some barges in our day Filled with lumber, coal, and hay And every inch of the way we know From Albany […]

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October 24 — Antoni von Leeuwenhoek born (1632)

Antoni von Leeuwenhoek, the Dutch scientist known as the “father of microbiology” was born on October 24, 1632.  Leeuwenhoek was the first person to identify the small “animalcules” that we now know as bacteria and other forms of microscopic life. Leeuwenhoek was anything but a classical biologist.  Born in Delft, Holland, to working class parents, […]

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October 23 — Cumberland Island National Seashore established (1972)

President Richard Nixon signed into law the creation of Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, on October 23, 1972.  His action punctuated a 400-year-old journey of human and natural change that continues to this day. Cumberland Island is the southernmost barrier island on Georgia’s Atlantic coast, between Jekyll Island on the north and Florida’s Amelia Island […]

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